Smartbuilding Agriculture

World Bank: Africa’s Agriculture and Agribusiness Markets Set to Top US$ One Trillion in 2030

A World Bank report “Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusiness,” says that Africa’s farmers and agribusinesses could create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030 if they can expand their access to more capital, electricity, better technology and irrigated land to grow high-value nutritious foods.  The report calls on governments to work side-by-side with agribusinesses, to link farmers with consumers in an increasingly urbanized Africa.

Looking Ahead

The report says agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. Strong leadership and commitment from both public and private sectors is needed.  For success, engaging with strategic “good practice” investors are critical.

“African farmers and businesses must be empowered through good policies, increased public and private investments and strong public-private partnerships,” says Gaiv Tata, World Bank Director for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa.  “A strong agribusiness sector is vital for Africa’s economic future.”

Spartan Modern Farming

Spartan can supply Agriculture Solutions, for the World Bank vision to deliver good practices in farming. Spartan has integrated Smart Buildings that utilize energy efficient buildings as the main Ag Center that rolls out the farming solutions, Spartan integrated add on kits deliver shipping containers (found in local ports)  for green houses and water cistern storage. Spartan has also designed highly efficient  food crops for the local African environment.  Green infrastructure for water systems that use of hydroponics,  water cistern systems, nutrient delivery systems, solar pumps, and in many African countries the utilization of building containers as germination and planting green houses.  The goals are to supply local food via Green Agriculture Methods and utilizing food science to grow and produce high quality food for profit.

That theory has spurred local Urban Agriculture in community gardens and local business that encourages locally grown food using modern agricultural methods.

Farming in Brooklyn has come full circle. Obviously, the first people here more than 350 years ago worked the land, and now a new generation of dwellers are doing it, too. Only this time, they are growing food in land wedged between concrete and buildings, infrastructure and roads and even on top of buildings.

It’s a return to the land, but not to land that’s uncharted. In urban areas, back to the land means claiming what is left. And that action, finding and utilizing open space, has defined urban agriculture in Brooklyn and across New York City.

More groups are getting involved in community gardening, farmer’s markets and farming in Brooklyn. Just Food arrived on the scene in 1995, helping to run community-based Farmer’s Markets and CSA (community supported agriculture) programs. Just Food also started their City Farms program, which trains and connects New York gardeners and farmers so that they can be empowered to grow healthy food in their communities. The program still exists today.

In 1998, East New York Farms! was founded. The organization was launched out of a community need to organize the large number of community gardeners and youth in the economically depressed neighborhood. And there were many gardens in East New York: at the time there were 65 community gardens in the neighborhood, more than in any other part of the city.

The mission was to assist and organize the gardeners working there already as well as recruit and inspire the new generation. East New York Farms! helped its members launch Farmer’s Markets so they could sell the vegetables they grew, as well as some produce from farms outside the city.

According to David Vigil, project director at East New York Farms!, while the organization thinks of itself as more of a “community building/ social justice” operation than a commercial farming one, they distribute a “significant” amount of nutritious food and their vendors and farmers make a profit off the food they grow and sell.

But the interest in local food and knowing the provenance of what you eat just continues to rise. Take, for example, the growth of food businesses like Good Eggs, which is like Fresh Direct but only stocks local produce and products, and plans to expand from Brooklyn and into other borough’s next year.

The current systems in Brooklyn as measured against traditional agriculture, can save up to 90% of water usage.

Spartan believes in Smartbuilding Farms that will use Tesla Powerwall systems with Solar Panels and exist go off-the -grid via sun and or wind energy.  To promote local business and supply local food to the population.

Modern Farming

Spartan can supply Agriculture Solutions, that utilize energy efficient buildings that via the use of hydroponics water systems, nutrient delivery systems, solar pumps, and in many African countries the utilization of building containers as germination and planting green houses.  The goals are to supply local food via Green Agriculture Methods and utilizing food science to grow and produce high quality food for profit.

That theory has spurred local Urban Agriculture in community gardens and local business that encourages locally grown food using modern agricultural methods.

Farming in Brooklyn has come full circle. Obviously, the first people here more than 350 years ago worked the land, and now a new generation of dwellers are doing it, too. Only this time, they are growing food in land wedged between concrete and buildings, infrastructure and roads and even on top of buildings.

It’s a return to the land, but not to land that’s uncharted. In urban areas, back to the land means claiming what is left. And that action, finding and utilizing open space, has defined urban agriculture in Brooklyn and across New York City.

More groups are getting involved in community gardening, farmer’s markets and farming in Brooklyn. Just Food arrived on the scene in 1995, helping to run community-based Farmer’s Markets and CSA (community supported agriculture) programs. Just Food also started their City Farms program, which trains and connects New York gardeners and farmers so that they can be empowered to grow healthy food in their communities. The program still exists today.

In 1998, East New York Farms! was founded. The organization was launched out of a community need to organize the large number of community gardeners and youth in the economically depressed neighborhood. And there were many gardens in East New York: at the time there were 65 community gardens in the neighborhood, more than in any other part of the city.

The mission was to assist and organize the gardeners working there already as well as recruit and inspire the new generation. East New York Farms! helped its members launch Farmer’s Markets so they could sell the vegetables they grew, as well as some produce from farms outside the city.

According to David Vigil, project director at East New York Farms!, while the organization thinks of itself as more of a “community building/ social justice” operation than a commercial farming one, they distribute a “significant” amount of nutritious food and their vendors and farmers make a profit off the food they grow and sell.

But the interest in local food and knowing the provenance of what you eat just continues to rise. Take, for example, the growth of food businesses like Good Eggs, which is like Fresh Direct but only stocks local produce and products, and plans to expand from Brooklyn and into other borough’s next year.

The current systems in Brooklyn as measured against traditional agriculture, can save up to 90% of water usage.

Spartan believes in Smartbuilding Farms that will use Tesla Powerwall systems with Solar Panels and exist go off-the -grid via sun and or wind energy.  To promote local business and supply local food to the population.